For most of the day on Sunday (August 19) the dark clouds hovered menacingly low over Biggin Hill Airport, the venue of the annual airshow.

At one stage the dreary weather raised doubts over whether or not the iconic RAF squadron would even perform their spectacular routine come 4pm.

But, as if by magic, come the scheduled time of the display, the clouds disappeared and the sun shone as the colours of red, white and blue followed the popular Red Arrows wherever they went.

It was a simply stunning performance, and was viewed by the thousands of spectators who were either filming the display on their phones, or taking it all in with their own eyes.

It was the Red Arrows’ second display at the airshow, with their performance on Saturday (August 18) equally as remarkable.

And perhaps the squadron were lucky to grace the sky for a second time, considering they cancelled their scheduled display at the Eastbourne airshow on Sunday morning due to bad weather.

The squadron were no doubt the star attraction of an event which has never failed to disappoint, but there was as much entertainment on the ground as there was in the sky.

Matthew Corton, 38, from Borough Green, visited the airshow with wife Lauren and their child and thought it was an “amazing” expierience.

“We came as Lauren had never seen the Red Arrows before and it’s been amazing,” he said.

“Looking at the Spitfires was the best thing for me and I was quite moved by it, which I wasn’t expecting to be. It makes you appreciate how small they are and what the pilots had to go through.

“It’s gone really well today. There’s plenty of space which is a good thing and with the planes, food stalls and kids’ entertainment, it’s integrated well.”

Officially known as the Festival of Flight, the airshow featured an abundance of historic planes, vehicles and entertainment.

Among the aircraft on the ground was an RAF Tucano, Spitfires, Hurricanes and a host of military vehicles and classic cars.

The events of The Hardest Day which took place during the Battle of Britain on August 18, 1940 were also recreated.

The day is considered as one of the most poignant in British history and was a hard-fought battle between the German Luftwaffe and the RAF, with both sides suffering heavy losses.

Spectators’ jaws dropped as they watched the display, and at one point a fireball erupted into the sky, with at least 20 aircraft wowing the crowd.

Re-enactors called “RAF at War” also spent time in between displays showing spectators exactly what gunners did when under attack during World War Two.

Among the aircraft which took to the skies were 12 Spitfires and Hurricanes, which were alongside their Second World War adversary the Luftwaffe’s ME109.

Fighters aside, the most successful RAF heavy bomber the Avro Lancaster also flew high on both Saturday and Sunday.

Visitors also witnessed a nerve-jangling performances by the Flying Circus Wingwalkers, while they were also treated to a rare showing of a Bristol Blenheim light bomber.

John Marsh, 77, from Biggin Hill, was with wife Maureen, 76, and said: “It’s been fantastic.

“The Red Arrows were the highlight but seeing the Hurricane, Lancaster and Spitfire in formation was amazing. We’ve been coming to this show for 15 or so years and it gets better and better.

“It’s amazing how well they maintain and look after the aeroplanes and reminds you how great this country is and hopefully inspires the next generation.

“There’s a lot for kids to do but it’s better that there wasn’t a funfair as the people that have come are more interested in the planes which is what it’s about.”

This year’s show commemorated the RAF’s centenary year, and, as many spectators would agree, the displays will live long in the memory.